Land Acknowledgement

Indigenous Peoples worldwide have been practicing healthy forms of non-monogamy long before the stigma of colonial rule.
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As PolyaMarla works to expand definitions of healthy relationships, we cannot ignore the colonial institutions that propagate monogamy as the only ‘correct’ partnership structure. As we continue to dismantle this paradigm known as “mononormativity”, we must also work to decolonize our understanding of love and relationships. Part of this process involves recognizing how Indigenous Peoples worldwide have been practicing healthy forms of non-monogamy long before the stigma and discrimination of colonial rule.

Another part of our work involves paying tribute to the Original Peoples who resided on these Lands before they were colonized. PolyaMarla is based in Tkaronto, Kanata (colonially known as Toronto, Canada).

Another part of our work involves paying tribute to the Original Peoples who resided on these Lands before they were colonized.

We are located on the original territories of The Anishinaabe, The Haudenosaunee, The Mississaugas of the Credit, The Chippewa, and The Huron-Wendat. We recognize the many Indigenous Peoples – recorded and unrecorded – who have stewarded, and resided on these territories throughout history.

In English, Tkaronto is translated from the Mohawk language (Kanyenʼkehá – pronounced gah-NYEN-geh-hah) as “The place in the water where the trees are standing”. Today, Tkaronto is covered under Treaty #13 and the Williams Treaties. This territory is part of ‘the Dish with One Spoon’ wampum, a Treaty made between the Anishinaabe, Mississaugas, and Haudenosaunee Peoples. These nations entered into an agreement to protect The Land, and to share responsibly in caring for its resources together. Those of us who are located on this territory – including settlers, newcomers, refugees, and Indigenous Peoples – have all been invited into this treaty in the spirit of peace, friendship, and respect.

Today, colonial systems and practices persist as treaties between Indigenous Peoples and the government of ‘Canada’ continue to be undermined and broken despite claims of investment in “Truth and Reconciliation”. We see evidence of this in the gender-based violence of the unsolved cases of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and Two-Spirit People (MMIWG2S), the overrepresentation of Indigenous youth in the ‘child welfare’ system, or in the ecological violence of oil pipelines illegally built on traditional Indigenous territories (and so much more).

We cannot acknowledge the impact of colonialism on this Land without honouring those who were brought here involuntarily through the trans-Atlantic slave trade. The country we now call Canada, was built on stolen Land and the forced labour of Black, Indigenous, and other racialized People. To this day, ‘Canada’ continues to be built by the labour of many immigrant and migrant workers. From construction to food production, to transportation services and beyond. This country relies heavily on the hard work of people from these communities, while simultaneously upholding systemic barriers to accessing residency and citizenship. Many newcomers are subjected to discrimination and racial inequalities as they navigate the harsh reality of the immigration process.

Canada, was built on stolen Land and the forced labour of Black, Indigenous, and other racialized Peopl..

The PolyaMarla team recognizes that the process of unlearning the paradigms of colonialism and White Supremacy will be lifelong and ongoing. We are all invested in this work as individuals through our learning, activism, community participation, and by subsidizing causes that strive for equity. As a collective, we are committed to strengthening these practices, and continuing to weave them into our programming.

We are invested in education that is aligned with anti-racist and decolonizing practices, as well as learning from educators and community members who have been historically marginalized and oppressed under these systems. PolyaMarla’s commitment to speaking out against injustice includes amplifying the voices of Black, Brown, Indigenous, and other people of the global majority.

As PolyaMarla works to expand definitions of healthy relationships, we cannot ignore the colonial institutions that propagate monogamy as the only ‘correct’ partnership structure. As we continue to dismantle this paradigm known as “mononormativity”, we must also work to decolonize our understanding of love and relationships. Part of this process involves recognizing how Indigenous Peoples worldwide have been practicing healthy forms of non-monogamy long before the stigma and discrimination of colonial rule.

Another part of our work involves

paying tribute to the Original Peoples who resided on these Lands before they were colonized. PolyaMarla is based in Tkaronto, Kanata (colonially known as Toronto, Canada).

We are located on the original territories of The Anishinaabe, The Haudenosaunee, The Mississaugas of the Credit, The Chippewa, and The Huron-Wendat. We recognize the many Indigenous Peoples – recorded and unrecorded – who have stewarded, and resided on these territories throughout history.

In English, Tkaronto is translated from the Mohawk language (Kanyenʼkehá – pronounced gah-NYEN-geh-hah) as “The place in the water where the trees are standing”. Today, Tkaronto is covered under Treaty #13 and the Williams Treaties. This territory is part of ‘the Dish with One Spoon’ wampum, a Treaty made between the Anishinaabe, Mississaugas, and Haudenosaunee Peoples. These nations entered into an agreement to protect The Land, and to share responsibly in caring for its resources together. Those of us who are located on this territory – including settlers, newcomers, refugees, and Indigenous Peoples – have all been invited into this treaty in the spirit of peace, friendship, and respect.

Today, colonial systems and practices persist as treaties between Indigenous Peoples and the government of ‘Canada’ continue to be undermined and broken despite claims of investment in “Truth and Reconciliation”. We see evidence of this in the gender-based violence of the unsolved cases of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and Two-Spirit People (MMIWG2S), the overrepresentation of Indigenous youth in the ‘child welfare’ system, or in the ecological violence of oil pipelines illegally built on traditional Indigenous territories (and so much more).

We cannot acknowledge the impact of colonialism on this Land without honouring those who were brought here involuntarily through the trans-Atlantic slave trade. The country we now call Canada, was built on stolen Land and the forced labour of Black, Indigenous, and other racialized People. To this day, ‘Canada’ continues to be built by the labour of many immigrant and migrant workers. From construction to food production, to transportation services and beyond.

This country relies heavily on the hard work of people from these communities, while simultaneously upholding systemic barriers to accessing residency and citizenship. Many newcomers are subjected to discrimination and racial inequalities as they navigate the harsh reality of the immigration process.

The PolyaMarla team recognizes that the process of unlearning the paradigms of colonialism and White Supremacy will be lifelong and ongoing. We are all invested in this work as individuals through our learning, activism, community participation, and by subsidizing causes that strive for equity. As a collective, we are committed to strengthening these practices, and continuing to weave them into our programming.

We are invested in education that is aligned with anti-racist and decolonizing practices, as well as learning from educators and community members who have been historically marginalized and oppressed under these systems. PolyaMarla’s commitment to speaking out against injustice includes amplifying the voices of Black, Brown, Indigenous, and other people of the global majority.

As PolyaMarla works to expand definitions of healthy relationships, we cannot ignore the colonial institutions that propagate monogamy as the only ‘correct’ partnership structure. As we continue to dismantle this paradigm known as “mononormativity”, we must also work to decolonize our understanding of love and relationships. Part of this process involves recognizing how Indigenous Peoples worldwide have been practicing healthy forms of non-monogamy long before the stigma and discrimination of colonial rule.

Another part of our work involves paying tribute to the Original Peoples who resided on these Lands before they were colonized. PolyaMarla is based in Tkaronto, Kanata (colonially known as Toronto, Canada).

Another part of our work involves paying tribute to the Original Peoples who resided on these Lands before they were colonized.

We are located on the original territories of The Anishinaabe, The Haudenosaunee, The Mississaugas of the Credit, The Chippewa, and The Huron-Wendat. We recognize the many Indigenous Peoples – recorded and unrecorded – who have stewarded, and resided on these territories throughout history.

In English, Tkaronto is translated from the Mohawk language (Kanyenʼkehá – pronounced gah-NYEN-geh-hah) as “The place in the water where the trees are standing”. Today, Tkaronto is covered under Treaty #13 and the Williams Treaties. This territory is part of ‘the Dish with One Spoon’ wampum, a Treaty made between the Anishinaabe, Mississaugas, and Haudenosaunee Peoples. These nations entered into an agreement to protect The Land, and to share responsibly in caring for its resources together. Those of us who are located on this territory – including settlers, newcomers, refugees, and Indigenous Peoples – have all been invited into this treaty in the spirit of peace, friendship, and respect.

Today, colonial systems and practices persist as treaties between Indigenous Peoples and the government of ‘Canada’ continue to be undermined and broken despite claims of investment in “Truth and Reconciliation”. We see evidence of this in the gender-based violence of the unsolved cases of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and Two-Spirit People (MMIWG2S), the overrepresentation of Indigenous youth in the ‘child welfare’ system, or in the ecological violence of oil pipelines illegally built on traditional Indigenous territories (and so much more).

We cannot acknowledge the impact of colonialism on this Land without honouring those who were brought here involuntarily through the trans-Atlantic slave trade. The country we now call Canada, was built on stolen Land and the forced labour of Black, Indigenous, and other racialized People. To this day, ‘Canada’ continues to be built by the labour of many immigrant and migrant workers. From construction to food production, to transportation services and beyond. This country relies heavily on the hard work of people from these communities, while simultaneously upholding systemic barriers to accessing residency and citizenship. Many newcomers are subjected to discrimination and racial inequalities as they navigate the harsh reality of the immigration process.

Canada, was built on stolen Land and the forced labour of Black, Indigenous, and other racialized People.

The PolyaMarla team recognizes that the process of unlearning the paradigms of colonialism and White Supremacy will be lifelong and ongoing. We are all invested in this work as individuals through our learning, activism, community participation, and by subsidizing causes that strive for equity. As a collective, we are committed to strengthening these practices, and continuing to weave them into our programming.

We are invested in education that is aligned with anti-racist and decolonizing practices, as well as learning from educators and community members who have been historically marginalized and oppressed under these systems. PolyaMarla’s commitment to speaking out against injustice includes amplifying the voices of Black, Brown, Indigenous, and other people of the global majority.

Learn More

Native-land.ca is an invaluable resource for learning more about Indigenous Territories across Turtle Island (colonially known as North America) and beyond. We invite you to join us in learning more about the Indigenous histories of the places where you live and visit.

Why acknowledge Indigenous territories (and how)?

The Critical Polyamorist blog – by Kim Tallbear, provides Indigenous perspectives on decolonizing relationships and non-monogamies.

Indigenous Canada Free Courses. This is a self-paced online course series from University of Alberta. There are 12 modules and approx 21 hours of learning. This is an excellent resource for including Indigenous awareness and histories as part of personal or professional development.

Reclaiming Power and Place. The Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

Truth and Reconciliation Reports. Resources about the findings of Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). It includes historical accounts from residential school survivors, links for community support, government documents, and much more.

Support

*Please note that we are including ‘Canada’-specific organizations based on our location. However, we also support Indigenous sovereignty worldwide. PolyaMarla does not have direct affiliation with these organizations.

The Native Youth Sexual Health Network (NYSHN) is an organization by and for Indigenous youth that works across issues of sexual and reproductive health, rights, and justice throughout the United States and Canada.

Native Women’s Resource Centre of Toronto This organization provides support (housing, meals, mental health, ceremony, etc.) for Indigenous women and their children in the Greater Toronto Area.

RAVEN  Indigenous environmental justice organization. “RAVEN raises legal defence funds for Indigenous Peoples in Canada to defend rights and the integrity of lands and cultures.”

First Nations Health Authority “The FNHA is working to transform and reform the way health care is delivered to First Nations people in BC.” FNHA is the “first and only” provincial First Nations health authority in Canada. They have helplines for adults and youth in British Columbia, as well as an extensive list of other health, wellness, and medical-related resources.

Shop First Nations This site is dedicated to highlighting Indigenous owned businesses in Canada. This link is to Ontario’s list, however you can select different provinces to find local Indigenous businesses.

Hope for Wellness Helpline “The Hope for Wellness Helpline is available to all Indigenous people across Canada. Experienced and culturally competent counsellors are reachable by telephone and online ‘chat’ 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.” Services are offered in English and French. Support can be requested in Cree, Ojibway (Anishinaabemowin), and Inuktitut, but may not be available at all hours/days.

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